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Phya
 Phya
(@phya)
Trusted Member

One of the reasons I don't pirate is because there is soooooo many titles avilable I couldn't even imagine reading them all. Theres just too much @_@ 

As for titles being scanned because they wouldn't be released otherwise, after Giant Killing got released and then not dropped (after I feared it had been), I don't write anything off anymore. The only titles I see having absolutely no chance of ever being released are ones that we've been told explicitly no due to profitability (Junjou Romantica relicence) or content (Super Lovers)

Digital releases and subscriptions are really opening pathways to titles that in the pre-digital age of manga would have never seen the light of day.

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Posted : 23/06/2020 6:17 pm
jess
 jess
(@jessinbooks)
Trusted Member
Posted by: @phya

The only titles I see having absolutely no chance of ever being released are ones that we've been told explicitly no due to profitability (Junjou Romantica relicence) or content (Super Lovers)

Digital releases and subscriptions are really opening pathways to titles that in the pre-digital age of manga would have never seen the light of day.

I actually think content might not even be that much of a liability for some publishers with their own digital platforms. SuBLime might not want to touch Super Lovers (which is more than fair), but I could see a less mainstream place that doesn't have to worry about placating Amazon picking up more difficult titles. Maybe not Super Lovers - it's 15 vols already, content isn't its only problem - but there's plenty of shorter titles that seem more in reach these days than they once did.

I have a mental list of titles that I would be very surprised to see in English and if one mangaka in particular ever gets licensed, I'll be completely gobsmacked bc I can't even convince myself their work has a potential audience of more than five people. But it's not the content so much that feels like an issue any more.

(I do feel a bit sorry for Junjou Romantica fans, though. Understandable though it is that rescuing an ongoing title that already had a ton of vols released is financially unfeasible for a small imprint, there's not even the hope of a digital-only rescue any time soon bc the mangaka won't authorize digital releases.)

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Posted : 23/06/2020 8:34 pm
Paul
 Paul
(@youngbluespring)
Trusted Member
Posted by: @jessinbooks

(I do feel a bit sorry for Junjou Romantica fans, though. Understandable though it is that rescuing an ongoing title that already had a ton of vols released is financially unfeasible for a small imprint, there's not even the hope of a digital-only rescue any time soon bc the mangaka won't authorize digital releases.)

This is the first time I heard a mangaka declining a digital license offer...but oh well, gotta respect their wish. Any idea why they refused?

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Posted : 24/06/2020 4:52 pm
Paul
 Paul
(@youngbluespring)
Trusted Member
Posted by: @jessinbooks

might not even be that much of a liability for some publishers with their own digital platforms. SuBLime might not want to touch Super Lovers (which is more than fair), but I could see a less mainstream place that doesn't have to worry about placating Amazon picking up more difficult titles.

I was reflecting how Renta and its content suppliers are at a disadvantage over new subscription services due to its English language ops being based in the US. It's not just the additional overhead, but entanglement with US marketplaces (and laws/values you may argue). Amazon has been too powerful for publishers BL and non-BL alike to deal with, but its control of the market also mean little choice but do business with them.

With business processes going digital there is less incentive for Japanese publishers to use America as springboard for English language publication. Futekiya seem to have their own translation partners while its HQ is in Japan; Manga.Club & Bookwalker can host English titles translated by random freelancers without worrying about physical offices or how licensing choices will affect American audiences. America is still a big and profitable market, but at least publishers can take some risk now to appeal to English speakers in markets with different cultures and views about BL.

 

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by Paul
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Posted : 24/06/2020 5:12 pm
jess
 jess
(@jessinbooks)
Trusted Member
Posted by: @youngbluespring
Posted by: @jessinbooks

(I do feel a bit sorry for Junjou Romantica fans, though. Understandable though it is that rescuing an ongoing title that already had a ton of vols released is financially unfeasible for a small imprint, there's not even the hope of a digital-only rescue any time soon bc the mangaka won't authorize digital releases.)

This is the first time I heard a mangaka declining a digital license offer...but oh well, gotta respect their wish. Any idea why they refused?

As far as I know, and I don't know how accurate this actually is, she's concerned about piracy. And in fairness, if you look through comments on some of SuBLime's older titles, it's clear that a fair few were initially physical only because they couldn't get the digital rights then.

And I don't know that I agree about Renta being at a disadvantage - Renta may have an office in the US, but their operations are based out of Tokyo. They aren't contending with the US marketplace in anywhere near the same way as more conventional publishers, so they aren't restricted by the particular demands of Amazon... and a lot of Amazon's content issues with manga are less based on US laws and values and more based on keeping Comixology sfw in a particular way using algorithms and very little human judgment. J-Novel Club just had a bunch of digital titles rejected by Amazon and unless all that isekai is a lot sexier than I thought, content/market demands weren't the issue there, bad algorithms were.

I know the US market has a huge impact on what gets licensed in English, but it'll have a huge impact regardless of where a company has an office just because of size. Digital-only companies with their own platform will always have the advantage over more conventional publishers in terms of how much they can pick up, and right now I think the non-financial limitations are more on the Japanese side of things.

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Posted : 24/06/2020 6:48 pm
Phya
 Phya
(@phya)
Trusted Member
Posted by: @youngbluespring America is still a big and profitable market, but at least publishers can take some risk now to appeal to English speakers in markets with different cultures and views about BL.

This would be quite interesting to see if opinions are different. I know we don't have much insight on manga, but we have some on anime to show tastes are different.

Crunchyroll now regularly does thier world map showing which series was most popular in each country (which sometimes be universal) but is interesting to see. In the UK, our publishers have always been quite truthful with us too and have said what is popular in America doesn't nesseserily translate here. They found in the US fan service series did better while with us it seemed to be films.

I wonder if any of the sites mentioned take notice of differences in region.

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Posted : 24/06/2020 7:05 pm
jess
 jess
(@jessinbooks)
Trusted Member
Posted by: @phya
 
Crunchyroll now regularly does thier world map showing which series was most popular in each country (which sometimes be universal) but is interesting to see. In the UK, our publishers have always been quite truthful with us too and have said what is popular in America doesn't nesseserily translate here. They found in the US fan service series did better while with us it seemed to be films.

I'm kinda curious about this too. Crunchyroll's maps are definitely affected by licensing restrictions, making it difficult to fully compare differences between regions there, but the manga sites aren't restricted in the same way.

I also wonder whether bl being such a niche affects regional trends. Maybe it's harder to see differences in preferences when there's relatively less difference in the genre to begin with. Or maybe English sales in particular places are affected by what publishers in other languages are licensing - I've seen French speakers moaning about certain titles being in English but not French, so they buy those titles in English. What bilingual readers pick up in English may well be very different from monolingual English readers pick up because they have options they prefer for other titles.

There was one publisher out of Singapore, Chuang Yi, that published English-language manga and distributed mostly in Asia, but their lineup doesn't look noticeably different from US publishers from the same period in terms of choice of material. I'm not saying that means anything, esp since they closed up shop years ago, but I find it kinda interesting all the same.

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Posted : 24/06/2020 8:58 pm
MovingCastleofYaoi
(@movingcastleofyaoi)
Eminent Member
Posted by: @jessinbooks

And I don't know that I agree about Renta being at a disadvantage - Renta may have an office in the US, but their operations are based out of Tokyo. They aren't contending with the US marketplace in anywhere near the same way as more conventional publishers, so they aren't restricted by the particular demands of Amazon... and a lot of Amazon's content issues with manga are less based on US laws and values and more based on keeping Comixology sfw in a particular way using algorithms and very little human judgment. J-Novel Club just had a bunch of digital titles rejected by Amazon and unless all that isekai is a lot sexier than I thought, content/market demands weren't the issue there, bad algorithms were.

I saw something on Twitter earlier about the J-novel books being taken down and also have heard about payment processes (like credit card companies? or paypal?) being strict on R-18 content.

So there might be more barriers that Japanese publishers and licensors are facing that are way out of their control...

Posted by: @jessinbooks

I'm kinda curious about this too. Crunchyroll's maps are definitely affected by licensing restrictions, making it difficult to fully compare differences between regions there, but the manga sites aren't restricted in the same way.

I'd be interested in seeing more about this not sure how though.

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Posted : 29/06/2020 4:32 pm
jess
 jess
(@jessinbooks)
Trusted Member
Posted by: @MovingCastleofYaoi

I saw something on Twitter earlier about the J-novel books being taken down and also have heard about payment processes (like credit card companies? or paypal?) being strict on R-18 content.

So there might be more barriers that Japanese publishers and licensors are facing that are way out of their control...

Yeah, I don't think the credit card companies care so much, but Paypal is notoriously pretty prudish and Stripe pulled service for Futekiya for a little bit before they went and clarified that they weren't selling porn. But these issues would be the same in Japan too and god knows plenty of companies have found ways to handle known stumbling blocks like that. (I say this having spent a ridiculous amount of time on Fakku's website recently, looking to see if they'd put Canis up for sale in their storefront yet, and swimming through a sea of hentai that's definitely not Amazon-friendly in the process)

 

Unrelated to this, but going back to the discussion about company location, I was surprised to learn from their post about their AnimeExpo panel that the chairman of the company that owns Futekiya had previously been really high up at Viz. That makes a lot of sense in terms of the kinds of publisher connections they've been able to make that other services haven't. I wonder if that might be the real key to getting new release models out there: getting the right people with the right connections on board first and using those connections to build the right relationships.

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Posted : 29/06/2020 6:22 pm
Paul and Phya liked
MovingCastleofYaoi
(@movingcastleofyaoi)
Eminent Member
Posted by: @jessinbooks

I wonder if that might be the real key to getting new release models out there: getting the right people with the right connections on board first and using those connections to build the right relationships.

I think that might be the case with Mangamo too? They had a high up from like Kodansha or something I think? or Yen press, I can't remember.

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Posted : 01/07/2020 3:00 am
Paul liked
Paul
 Paul
(@youngbluespring)
Trusted Member
Posted by: @jessinbooks

Unrelated to this, but going back to the discussion about company location, I was surprised to learn from their post about their AnimeExpo panel that the chairman of the company that owns Futekiya had previously been really high up at Viz. That makes a lot of sense in terms of the kinds of publisher connections they've been able to make that other services haven't. I wonder if that might be the real key to getting new release models out there: getting the right people with the right connections on board first and using those connections to build the right relationships.

Viz is backed by Shueisha, right? Now it makes more sense why Futekiya (and Manga Planet) can easily pick up titles that won't fit with the main Jump. The connections really help.

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Posted : 03/07/2020 12:55 am
jess
 jess
(@jessinbooks)
Trusted Member

@youngbluespring - Shueisha, yes, and also Shogakukan. I don't know how much direct influence there would be (esp since I'm not sure how much say Shueisha necessarily has with Home-sha on a day to day operations level), but it sure couldn't hurt to have someone who demonstrably knows both the Japanese and English markets and helped helm one of the biggest names in English manga publishing when it comes to convincing publishers to take a chance on a new venture.

So much lives and dies by relationships, I find it fascinating if also often kinda frustrating because of what those relationships can signify licensing-wise.

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Posted : 03/07/2020 1:29 am
Phya and Paul liked
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